Reviews by Kishko

70

Prepare to die... often.

Kishko | Oct. 29, 2013 | Review of Teleglitch: Die More Edition

As the others reviewers point out, the game is not for everyone, but it wasn't meant to be. It was meant to be Quake roguelike top-down shooter and on these elements the game fares pretty well. The atmosphere is really intense: The space station is riddled with interdimentional black blobs that make your brain explode if you get too close; It is plagued with hordes of various mutants and monsters while the armament for your disposition is scarce. In order to keep your ammo at the reasonable level you will be forced to take risks and roam the station in search of materials, which you may combine and create new weapons and items. The game is quite hard and you have to prepare for numerous replays. The graphic side of the game resembles Quake with its bleak, monochrome palette while the pixel art tips the hat to the whole generation of retro games (while the font is a dead ringer for this used in Liero). The downside of this design is that after a while rooms start to look alike and repeat, there is a bit too little variation in elements you may find scattered on the level on every other replay. To sum up, the game is a fine treat for those with retro sensibilities, who are not easily scared by the high difficulty level. The price is a turnoff, but keep an eye for discounts such as the recent one and you may get it dirt cheap.

80

The rare example of an investigation

Kishko | Oct. 29, 2013 | Review of LA Noire The Complete Edition

LA Noire is the game that finally presents the player with a decent, believable crime investigation proceedings. Rockstar took effort to appeal to adventure games lovers with finding clues and trying to expose the lies during interrogations, generally putting the puzzle pieces together but also to fans of action elements (for those who don't like them there is an option to skip them): the game is full of chases, brawls, gunfights, all set in open city of Los Angeles. The city itself is presented with an eye for detail: the player can drive around LA looking for its landmarks in a variety of vehicles from the 50's. The game is cut into cases, most of which takes about an hour to break. It is a good idea, as the end of one case is a good moment to take a break. The game is not without flaws, though. Cases get repetitive after a while (after the third homicide in a row that suggested Black Dahlia I grew a bit weary). The protagonist lacks some emotional depth and character development. It also seems that he gets all the important cases.