Reviews for Sengoku

82

A great introduction to Grand Strategy games

sunshine_avis | Nov. 6, 2013 | See all sunshine_avis's reviews »

If you are like me and haven't played any grand strategy games before, Sengoku is a great place to start. While similar to the loved Crusader Kings II, it is definitely a lot easier to pick up and get the hang of things; it's a great game to introduce yourself to the mechanics and concepts behind grand strategy games. It's also just a lot of fun in general. You start by choosing a character from different clans; you can be clan leader (easier) or a Daimyo (a bit hard, you have to work yourself up to clan leader) of a clan. The goal is to eventually become Shogun of Japan by ruling over the majority of Japan (I think it was like own over 50%- can you tell I haven't become Shogun yet?). That brings me to my next point- you can spend a lot of time playing this game which makes it totally worth the price. I'm over 10 hours in and I still haven't "beat" the game because of multiple restarts due to things like civil wars, no heir, and a bunch of other things that it took me awhile to get a hold off. But once you get over the initial learning hurdle, it's truly a joy to play;I feel like I've already played enough to warrant the price and I know I'm going to put many, many more hours in. I think this game also has great replay value: it'll be fun to see how the game plays out with different clans and even daimyos.

Thankfully, I have not run into any bugs nor heard of any. It runs pretty smoothly. But I do have a couple of criticisms of the gameplay. The one thing that I think really annoyed me had to do with dealing with your daimyos. For one, I think it's a bit ridiculous that your daimyos can hold more land than you, as a ruler (once had a daimyo with 7 provinces to my max 5); it feels like your daimyos can very quickly gain power while you are a bit stilted by your limited provinces. It is also very hard to knock them out of power; you can ask them to resign but they never say yes. You can use some underhanded ways to knock them out (like using ninjas=awesome!) but it felt like my power as a clan leader was a bit undermined. Also, dealing with the budget can get old very quickly. I would have liked to have been able to see a breakdown of the budget so that when I was in the red, I could pinpoint what to cut out. More than often, it's your military that is draining resources but I have had a couple times when I had barely any military but a budget that was constantly in the negative. It would have been a nice touch if I could manually balance my budget rather than guessing at what was draining my resources. Overall, great game and a great way to introduce yourself to grand strategy games!

72

Japan Feudal strategy game

Solidice | June 27, 2013 | See all Solidice's reviews »

Sengoku starts in the year 1467 and the different clan are at war with each other. You take control over a family and try to unite the nation under a single rule. The game may feel similar to other Paradox's strategy games as it follows many of the common gameplay elements from their games.

The game if probably closest to Crusader Kings II in gameplay. You control a family, you can participate in plots against your enemies or allies. If you were looking for a game similar to Crusader Kings II, but in a Japanese setting, then this game will fit right in.

78

A good attempt at historical grand strategy in historical Japan

DaiMonPaul | June 27, 2013 | See all DaiMonPaul's reviews »

Sengoku is a solid strategy game, but it's probably the weakest of the Paradox Development titles. If you've played Crusader Kings 2, then you'll be familiar with this game; it has similar mechanics. As in CK2, you take control of a person in charge of a noble family and then control his or her dynasty throughout time, marrying off children, expanding influence, and conquering neighbors. However, Sengoku plays differently. Here, your goal is to unite Japan under your rule, which means that in order to win the game, you have to fight wars and conquer. Much of the game is geared towards this, leaving out some of the really fun, deep role-playing elements that made it into Crusader Kings 2. It's essentially a wargame with some additional diplomatic elements added.

This isn't a bad game by any stretch, though, and it's still fun to play. There aren't many bugs, and the game runs smoothly on my laptop. The map is really pretty, but because it contains topography, it can be a bit difficult to read at times (i.e. when something ends up in the mountains). Despite this, I enjoyed the game; it's not nearly as deep as Crusader Kings 2, but it shares some similar mechanics, and if you like the Japanese historical setting, it's a nice grand strategy (i.e. no real-time battles here) alternative to Shogun 2: Total War.