Impire

Impire on PC screenshot #1
Impire on PC screenshot #2
Impire on PC screenshot #3
Impire on PC screenshot #4
Impire on PC screenshot #5

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Third party DRM: Steam

This game requires a free Steam account to play.

Description

Deep in the underworld of Ardania, a threat of the most evil nature grows and multiplies with an appetite for destruction that is unsurpassed. Summoned from the depths of the Bottomless Pit, the (once) mighty Báal-Abaddon has been torn from his throne of skulls and imprisoned in an earthly body of less-than-imposing stature (he's an Imp, OK?) to serve the none-too-competent sorcerer Oscar van Fairweather. But unfortunately for Fairweather, the luck of the damned is on Báal's side and he soon breaks free to build his own dark and majestic... Impire.

Take control the of demon Báal-Abaddon as he attempts to rebuild his mighty hell spawn form. With the aid of dozens of evil creatures big and small as well as an arsenal of spells, you will help him construct a dungeon underworld of limitless evil and nastiness to stop all those pesky Heroes of Ardania from ruining his return to greatness!


Key Features:

  • Incarnate a demon of the abyss; make him evolve into a powerful dungeon lord and customize him through weapon and armor upgrades

  • Dig your own dungeon, build different room types, and craft wicked traps to stop your enemies

  • Beat up the heroes who attempt to thwart your plans, or even better, crush their souls and use them as resources to build up your dungeon

  • Recruit a vast array of creatures, level them up, and upgrade their equipment

  • Terrorize the surface of Ardania by raiding different locations, collecting treasures and riches along the way

  • Unlock unique magical item cards and mix and match them to build a deck that suits your playing style

  • Play the campaign in solo or in coop mode; or confront friends in different multiplayer game modes

Customer reviews

70

A fair attempt...

Klinhk | July 5, 2013 | See all Klinhk's reviews »

Right away, this is not like one of the older sim dungeon games you are expecting; Impire has more limitations on what you can do and how you can do it. However, at the given tag price, it isn't bad. You will find that the game-play and mechanics are entertaining for a while, even though creating your own special lair may become dull. Like other reviewers here, I also got too excited over this dungeon sim. That being said, I also played the game for a significant period of time. The only down side is once the initial flavor wears off there is not much to bring you back (even with the nice addition of coop)

60

My heart leapt at the finding, then fell out onto the floor.

TimothyD | May 30, 2013 | See all TimothyD's reviews »

The game is a melted snowcone, in the terms of original gameplay and scriptwriting. There is the mushy paper barrier in your hand, separating it from a pool of off-colored water that looks like the runoff from a paint factory. The mushy paper cone is the hope of a new Dungeon Keeper. It quickly dissolves, even into the tutorial level. Hopefully you weren't wearing good shoes, because the mess is all over you now. The colorful rainbow mess is what is left of the game. The construction of your dungeon relies only on digging out halls and corridors. The building layouts for rooms are all in linear sizes and shapes that never change. The only challenge to building is how to turn your rooms to make them fit certain corridors. A glorified functioning puzzle. Your monsters are simply conjured up from a barracks style room and put into control groups, where they can be easily managed using the number keys. The creatures are just about as smart as Sims without free-will turned on. They become stronger when they eat, but will only eat when instructed, for example, even though the AI could easily direct them to a kitchen to eat. Your missions stem from underground and above-ground missions. The above-ground missions are bland, consisting of only a map with icons to indicate missions. Your minions disappear onto this bland map, then eventually return to your dungeon with no degree of entertainment involved. The underground missions are more fun, with digging out tunnels and the such, but isn't the biggest stretch. Most of them consist of reaching into a dungeon area filled with enemies and clearing it out, pretty standard material. Impire feels like it was rushed in production, and could have been much better than it's current form, patch or no patch. While the premise is interesting, the jokes fall flat and the experience falls flat. It is a flat soft drink. So much promise, but no fix to leave you want more.

50

Not Like Dungeon Keeper, but OK if they patch it.

fable2 | Feb. 27, 2013 | See all fable2's reviews »

It's not a sim dungeon full of autonomous minions following needs, but it's got a lot of interesting concepts.

Dig tunnels, gather resources, place rooms, train minions, and explore the local dungeon. The gameplay has a lot of interesting concepts that don't feel nearly as fleshed out as they could have been, but work together to make a somewhat enjoyable game.

Unfortunately the game is riddled with bugs many of which are game crashing, and because units and traps are so limited and rooms are so simple and pre-made, the whole "Craft your perfect dungeon" appeal is missing.

I really want to love this game, games like this are quintessential to the PC gaming experience, this game just doesn't live up to it's potential and it still needs some serious patching. It's an enjoyable distraction if you can forgive it's faulty quirks, but it's not like Dungeon Keeper.

73

dungeon keeper returns... kinda

soad667 | Feb. 16, 2013 | See all soad667's reviews »

If you missed Dungeon Keeper, then you have to give this a try. The whole idea of being evil, building dungeons, fighting the good guys etc is there. It's a great concept, thank god there are publishers like Paradox who keep releasing stuff like this. Graphics are cute, but the whole game feels a bit rough on the edges. Same feeling you get with most of Paradox games, but such unique ideas can make you ignore that easily.