Dark Messiah Might & Magic

Third party DRM: Steam

This game requires a free Steam account to play.

Description

Discover a new breed of Action-RPG game powered by an enhanced version of the Source™ Engine by Valve. Set in the Might & Magic® universe, players will experience ferocious combat in a dark and immersive fantasy environment. Swords, Stealth, Sorcery. Choose your way to kill.


Key Features:

  • Cutting-edge technology:

    Experience an enhanced version of the famous Source™ Engine created by Valve. Discover the fresh perspective of a view with complete body awareness, realistic movements, physics rendering, and a complete first-person melee combat system in a fantasy setting.

  • Never-ending action:

    Challenge the forces of evil in 12 huge levels and learn to master over 30 weapons and an arsenal of devastating spells.

  • Evolve your character:

    Extend your gameplay experience without being limited to a single discipline. Learn powerful new spells and attacks using Dark Messiah's unique Skill Evolution System as you progress through the game.

  • Revolutionary multiplayer mode:

    Get ready to battle with up to 32 players in the revolutionary Crusade mode, which will enable players to gain experience and new skills across dynamic online campaigns. Enlist with the humans or the undead and choose among five complementary character classes.

Customer reviews

93

Best 1p-view combat system ever

Hexaae | March 17, 2014 | See all Hexaae's reviews »

You HAVE to play this game if you wanna play the best (yes, probably it's still the best in 2014) CS with blades/staffs/magic in first person ever done! Great atmosphere, great audio, still surprisingly good graphics + good physics and an interesting story with 2 different endings. Unleash you fantasy and kill the enemies in many ways you've never seen before (or copied, after, by some other games)! Still one of the best. Not so long to complete, but with a good re-playability due to the many RPG classes, perks, and weapons to master...

85

Great First Person Combat

Vlady | Dec. 29, 2013 | See all Vlady's reviews »

I was glued to the screen until I finished this game. One of the best fist person melee combat systems that I've ever seen. Very precise, responsive and visceral. It blows Elder Scrolls games out the water when it comes to gameplay. The story might be typical generic fantasy gibberish with light RPG elements, but the atmosphere and combat is superb. The age of the game shows, but it's still not ugly and should run well on any system by now.

82

Highly underrated classic

Gmen | Nov. 22, 2013 | See all Gmen's reviews »

The concept behind this is quite novel but probably nothing new. It’s a spin off of the famed Heroes of Might & Magic series, but instead of a strategy title, this is more of an action RPG. You take on the role of Sareth, a wizard’s apprentice who is sent on a seemingly harmless errand, but eventually Sareth ends up being involved in a much deeper plot, and is more central to the goings on in the game than he was originally aware of.

The game takes place in the first person perspective, and it would seem that this is nothing more than a linear hack and slash affair. But there are RPG elements involved. You can upgrade your character’s abilities, unlock powerful spells, or make him a force to be reckoned with in combat. Weapons, armour and items like rings also add to your abilities and grant you damage bonuses.

Melee combat is usually not the best way to go, and it’s a good thing that there are plenty of obstacles like barrels that you can use to throw at your enemies as well as traps that can work in your favour. Battles are therefore very bloody and engaging, challenging the player every time. One can also choose a stealthier approach, or use magic, or even a combination, to raise the odds in their favour.

The game uses the source engine which debuted in Half-Life 2. The characters aren’t very pretty and neither is the animation, but the surroundings and textures, especially in deeply atmospheric dark indoor environments, is where the looks of this game shine through.

The game is poorly optimised though and lag will be very apparent even on higher end systems. Long loading screens, freezes and crashes will also detract from the overall enjoyment of the game.

Overall, this is a highly underrated classic plagued by issues, that if overlooked, will reveal a decent game that will offer you several hours of fun. Unfortunately there isn’t much replayability value once you’ve finished it besides trying out a different skill tree (there is no fixed class system in singleplayer). Your best bet would be to try the multiplayer at this juncture seeing as there are no mods for this game, which is rather disappointing.

70

Fun, but where's the sequel?

nemesis44uk | Aug. 6, 2013 | See all nemesis44uk's reviews »

Dark Messiah of Might and Magic, or DMMM as it's easier known, is a "Fun with Physics" RPG that predates Skyrim.

At the time, DMMM was very impressive - allowing you to kick someone down the stairs, or into a spiked trap, or fire. Shoot the rope with an arrow and a bucket will fall on a troll's head.

Also, this is the first game I remember using bloom and HDR so effectively - they added a shine of realism to the graphics.

A fun little game which I was happy to support, but I find it odd that no sequel with improved graphics and physics has emerged.

Definitely worth a purchase, especially if you have a PC rig not quite up to spec as it is friendly in that respect.

75

Arkane's strange take on the Might and Magic series

Ganerumo | June 26, 2013 | See all Ganerumo's reviews »

Arkane Studios is not the kind of dev team to release a game every year. In fact, this French team has released a grand total of three games over their 11 years of existence : the most recent Dishonored, their oldest Arx Fatalis, and the strange one inbetween, Dark Messiah. Interestingly, each under a different publisher.

Dark Messiah of Might and Magic is kind of a weird one. While Arx Fatalis and Dishonored were entirely made by Arkane, both on the programming and conceptual side, Dark Messiah is based on a lore that was never thought up by Arkane, and it tells : while the gameplay is amazing, the universe is seriously lacking. Might and Magic being a rather dull universe compared to the eerie and almost lovecraftian designs of Arkane, Dark Messiah suffers from a lack of visual identity.

Gameplay wise, the game still holds up : everything is based around a very solid fighting system that feels sort of like Oblivion or Skyrim, but actually good : each weapons works in its own way and offers various types of gameplay, through aggressiveness or stealth. While magic alone is not exactly viable, it makes for some great fun when combined with proper swordfighting, or staff handling (casting a freeze spell on the ground to make people slip on it and fall down a bottomless pit is still one of my favorite moments in gaming history, hands down). This is probably the side of the game that survived the test of time the best. Almost makes me wish Dishonored had a similar system, rather than its dumbed down sword fighting.

On the matter of technical speaking, the game does suffer a bit : made with the Source Engine, a rather primitive and recent engine back in 2006, the game suffers from frequent loading times (thankfully made much shorter by recent hardware), rather low resolution textures and most importantly small area limitations, which consequently greatly limit the freedom of action factor of the title. It's possible to play stealthy, aggressive or a mix of both essentially, but the level design often makes it hard not to bump into a pack of enemies while you're desperately trying to avoid fights. Most secrets can be ignored as the game is made way too easy by the constant placement of traps and other hazards (spikewalls, pits, fire, etc) which mean you can end most fights with a well placed kick.

The game still holds up well, though. It does feel like a prototype forced into a full game at times, but for its price it's well worth a shot. Just make sure to play in hardcore to avoid turning the game into too much of a cakewalk.