Two Worlds: Game of the Year

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Third party DRM: Other

Playfire Client required to download and play.

Description

At the beginning of your epic adventure, a mercenary task takes you to the far north - but you’re also following up a mysterious lead at the same time - the first clue you’ve been given since Kyra’s disappearance. You get a shock during a meeting with the delegates of a dark Brotherhood - your sister’s kidnappers are indeed after your family’s relict.Whether there’s any truth in your family being chosen ones of not, the others obviously believe it - and if you ever want to see Kyra again, you’ll have to act swiftly...

###Key Features

The Game of the Year Edition includes SR 1.7 and the Add-On Tainted Blood.

  • STUPENDOUS LANDSCAPES: in a fantasy world where every inhabitant leads a separate dynamic life with realistic daily routines, your deeds will determine the fate of the strife-torn land of Antaloor.

  • PLAYING FREEDOM: Two Worlds is not for those who don't like making decisions, because you'll often have to take one side or the other - an intelligent, networked reputation system for guilds and secret societies makes sure of that.

  • KNIGHT, THIEF, MAGE OR ALCHEMIST: spectacular, dynamically-choreographed fights on foot or at full gallop. An absorbing alchemy system for creating individual potions and power-ups provides diversification - and carrying out break-ins in Sneak mode will have your nerves jangling! If this still isn’t enough, try the sophisticated magic system... INTUITIVE INTERFACE AND INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT OF ATTRIBUTES: you can experiment with all the character attributes and develop your skills as and when you like. An elaborate inventory system ensures that you always have a clear overview - no matter how hot the action gets. MASSIVE MULTIPLAYER INCLUDED: bustling towns are the trading centers and meeting points for several hundred players. Self-created characters fight gripping PvsP duels in Arena mode - or solve a series of exciting quests as allies.

Customer reviews

95

Gothic 3, Morrowind, and a ton of Fantasy

yarow12 | July 16, 2014 | See all yarow12's reviews »

This review is only based on single player of the Game of the Year Edition with the 1.7b patch, which includes the Curse of Souls add-on, thus making it the Epic Edition. Be sure to read the very bottom if you used this method.

All I'll say about the multiplayer is that when I tried it last year, the server was empty. Get some buddies to join you if don't want it to be a singleplayer MMO that atleast lets you create your own character (face, body, sex, skin) and choose your playstyle (dualwield, etc).

First of all, the game looks a lot better (HUD, graphics) now than it did when the screenshots were taken. Those should seriously be replaced. Second, like many games that receive patches, probably every video review you find for Two Worlds will no longer be accurate.

Now for the review... I haven't encountered many problems with Two Worlds, and crashing is a rarity. Exploring the ridiculously huge map is worthwhile, but only in intervals. There's so much to see that I have to force myself to uncover it all. Enemies don't respawn, but the map is so massive that you'll encounter and ride past so many it will feel as if they're haunting you. In fact, some will. The reason why the seemingly never ending battles don't bother me, besides the fact that there are explanations for so many enemies waiting for a traveler like you to pass by, is because I can easily choose to ride past them and stop aiming to defeat everything. Just like in Fallout 3, which has completely unnecessary items that can be found just about everywhere, players can waste their time fighting enemies who have no need to die. And the best part? The game allows this. Two Worlds allows you to suffer (more on this later). The dialogue is well done, hilarious at times, and different from what I'm used to. Some people complain about 'terrible voice acting' when really it's the dialect being spoken that bothers them so much. The game 'Zeno Clash' is in the same boat. Some people like its dialect and some people don't. There are far too many side quests available. Completionists will suffer greatly by how much this game has to offer. I'm serious. If you have a problem with not doing every quest a game has to offer, this one will punish you for it. The side quests are interesting, though, and surprisingly add to the story and lore. I have yet to find one that's a generic dullfest. Most of the side quests are more interesting than the few main quests I've done so far. Speaking of which, I've heard that the main story can be finished in less than 5 hours. Harold Faltermeyer did an amazing job with the soundtrack. It's very diverse and surprised me at times. The three classes (Archer, Mage, and Warrior) can be used as pleased with very little restrictions other than the limit of skill point allocations, which can be bypassed by certain NPCs. I've found magic to be the most useful, melee to be the best option especially with its large weapon variety, and archery to be the most limited. Fair warning about melee: Attack, dodge, attack. The fun part is using different weapons and skills. This is no hack-and-slash; back jumping is there for a reason. Fair warning about ranged: Prepare to stand, fire, and dodge an oncoming missile from the enemy you just fired at. This is one of the only two dullfests I've experienced in the game, but only after having used it for so long. Fair warning about magic: Though there are many different spells (I like the system used), it's weak as hell. Truth be told, that may be because I invested a ton more into strength instead. I should probably reallocate those skill points and test that theory out sometime soon. The upgrade system of weapons, armor, and spells are are very well done.

The only real problem that I've experienced with Two Worlds is the inability to ride horses up and down hills. They can only be properly ridden on paths, but can be whistled (called for) on any piece of land. This took getting used to in the beginning, but the game becomes much easier as I learn more about how it works.

There is something about this game that may remind some of Gothic 3 and Morrowind. Anyone who enjoyed them will likely enjoy Two Worlds: Epic Edition aswell.

Even though my laptop isn't made for gaming, Two Worlds runs perfectly fine. Here's my hardware for those wondering if the game will run on their computer: Presario CQ57-439WM Notebook PC Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit Service Pack 1 HD Radeon 6310 Graphics (384MB) AMD E-300 APU with Radeon HD Graphics, ~1.30GHz 2048MB RAM (1642MB RAM available OS memory)

For those who manually installed the 1.7b patch for the GOTY edition, here are two useful fixes from propheet: "In console write: engine.lod0 950 and engine.lod1 1450 Or use the .con with both those lines. Search for instructions on .con usage.

The mouths move, trees look nice, golems etc. have full textures."

94

Gothic 3, Morrowind, and a ton of Fantasy

yarow12 | July 8, 2014 | See all yarow12's reviews »

This review is only based on single player with the 1.7b patch, which makes this version the Epic Edition and includes the Curse of Souls add-on. All I'll say about the multiplayer is that when I tried it last year, the server was empty. Get some buddies to join you if don't want it to be a singleplayer MMO that atleast lets you create your own character (face, body, sex, skin) and choose your playstyle.

I haven't encountered many problems with Two Worlds, and crashing is a rarity. Exploring the ridiculously huge map is worthwhile, but only in intervals. There's so much to see that I have to force myself to uncover it all. Enemies don't respawn, but the map is so massive that you'll encounter and ride past so many it will feel as if they're haunting you. In fact, some will. The reason why the seemingly never ending battles don't bother me, besides the fact that there are explanations for so many enemies waiting for a traveler like you to pass by, is because I can easily choose to ride past them and stop aiming to defeat everything. Just like in Fallout 3, which has completely unnecessary items that can be found just about everywhere, players can waste their time fighting enemies who have no need to die. And the best part? The game allows this. Two Worlds allows you to suffer (more on this later). The dialogue is well done, hilarious at times, and different from what I'm used to. Some people complain about 'terrible voice acting' when really it's the dialect being spoken that bothers them so much. The game 'Zeno Clash' is in the same boat. Some people like its dialect and some people don't. There are far too many side quests available. Completionists will suffer greatly by how much this game has to offer. I'm serious. If you have a problem with not doing every quest a game has to offer, this one will punish you for it. The side quests are interesting, though, and surprisingly add to the story and lore. I have yet to find one that's a generic dullfest. Most of the side quests are more interesting than the few main quests I've done so far. Speaking of which, I've heard that the main story can be finished in less than 5 hours. Harold Faltermeyer did an amazing job with the soundtrack. It's very diverse and surprised me at times. The three classes (Archer, Mage, and Warrior) can be used as pleased with very little restrictions other than the limit of skill point allocations, which can be bypassed by certain NPCs. I've found magic to be the most useful, melee to be the best option especially with its large weapon variety, and archery to be the most limited.

Fair warning about melee: This is no hack-and-slash; back jumping is there for a reason. Fair warning about ranged: Prepare to stand, fire, and dodge an oncoming missile from the enemy you just fired at. This is the only 'dullfest' I've experienced in the game, but only after having used it for so long. Fair warning about magic: Though there are many different spells (I like the system used), it's weak as hell. Truth be told, that may be because I invested a ton more into strength instead. I should probably reallocate those skills and test that theory out sometime soon. The upgrade system of weapons, armor, and spells are are very well done.

The only real problem that I've experienced with Two Worlds is the inability to ride horses up and down hills. They can only be properly ridden on paths, but can be whistled (called for) on any piece of land. This took getting used to in the beginning, but the game becomes much easier as I learn more about how it works.

There is something about this game that may remind some of Gothic 3 and Morrowind. Anyone who enjoyed them will likely enjoy Two Worlds: Epic Edition aswell.

Even though my laptop isn't made for gaming, Two Worlds runs perfectly fine. Here's my hardware for those wondering if the game will run on their computer: Presario CQ57-439WM Notebook PC Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit Service Pack 1 HD Radeon 6310 Graphics (384MB) AMD E-300 APU with Radeon HD Graphics, ~1.30GHz 2048MB RAM (1642MB RAM available OS memory)

85

Better than Oblivion

AkiMatti | April 15, 2014 | See all AkiMatti's reviews »

Crashes less than Oblivion, the world seems more atmospheric and authentic, running around the world feels better and the battles feel also better.

For some reason, in this game I was more interested in the characters, too, than in Oblivion. It just feels like playing the character since you can see it all the time. Bandits are something to be afraid of and so are the wild animals. Even gathering the flora and mushrooms and stuff from the environments is more interesting than in Oblivion.

This is entirely a subjective feeling since I cannot do a precise reasoning why it is so but Two Worlds just feels so much better. Try it, even the demo, if you don't believe me. And see for yourself.

50

Not my cup of RPG

Avesomeofthat13 | Aug. 6, 2013 | See all Avesomeofthat13's reviews »

Originally I bought this because I thought it would be like Oblivion. I was wrong. I had already played Oblivion before buying this; which I believe is why I am so cynical about Two Worlds. In my eyes, it's a short sighted clone of Oblivion (obviously it isn't, but its how I see it). My reasoning comes from the poor movement and actions in this game. When you jump, your player moves into the air before doing the jumping animation - which doesn't look great. Plus movement is a little jumpy and haphazardly, not great in my eyes. I never actually got to do any combat, because the movement and inventory menu really did look and feel very poor. I think you have to be an avid fan of RPG games to enjoy this - so you should try it, but don't expect much.

80

Underrated RPG

Oblaque | July 30, 2013 | See all Oblaque's reviews »

This game may have had problems when first released, but I give it top scores for being a memorable and engaging RPG. The enemies were diverse, the world diverse, and the "mount" options fun. This game never got repetitive. I've played it twice, and am thinking about reinstalling for a third go round. I think this one got short changed because people compared it to Oblivion. Oblivion was a little prettier, but this game deserves a better rating than it got.